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World Population

 

Total World Population in Selected Years:

Year
Population
(in millions)
10000 BC
4
5000 BC
5
4000 BC
7
3000 BC
14
2000 BC
27
1000 BC
50
500 BC
100
200 BC
150
0
170
200 AD
190
400 AD
190
500 AD
190
600 AD
200
700 AD
210
800 AD
220
900 AD
240
1000 AD
265
1100 AD
320
1200 AD
360
1300 AD
360
1400 AD
350
1500 AD
425
1550 AD
480
1600 AD
545
1650 AD
545
1700 AD
610
1750 AD
720
1800 AD
900
1850 AD
1200
1875 AD
1325
1900 AD
1625
1925 AD
2000
1950 AD
2500
1975 AD
3900
1999 AD
6000

 

 

Percentages of World Population by Area and Date:

date
China
India
Other
Europe
Africa
other
Asia
400 BC
27
24
21
18
7
3
200 BC
28
21
23
18
7
3
0
30
21
18
18
10
3
200 AD
32
22
15
19
9
3
400 AD
27
25
17
17
10
4
600 AD
23
26
24
13
10
4
800 AD
23
29
18
13
13
4
1000
23
30
17
14
12
4
1100
31
26
14
14
11
4
1200
32
24
14
16
11
3
1300
23
25
15
22
11
4
1400
21
28
18
17
12
4
1500
23
25
18
19
11
4
1600
28
25
17
18
10
2
1700
25
27
16
20
10
2
1750
30
24
15
19
9
3
1800
35
21
13
20
8
3
1850
35
19
12
22
7
5
1900
28
18
14
24
7
9
1950
21
18
19
21
8
13
1975
18
20
21
16
10
15
1997
21
21
18
13
13
14

 

Notes:

While world population growth in a sense transcends the narrative of human history, it has important implications both for the writing of history and prediction of its future course.

First, the space given particular peoples and regions in books of world history should roughly mirror their populations. Together, India and China have consistently had one third to one half of the earth’s population. These nations should have comparable coverage in world history. Since world history is a creation story, that formula is not strictly observed; events that have originated important practices and institutions should, of course, be disproportionately represented in the histories. Even so, world history should describe the experience of the bulk of humanity rather than of any particular subgroup.

Second, to take population into consideration in world history’s design helps to restore proportionality to a scheme in which historical epochs become steadily shorter in terms of time. In terms of man-years of human experience, the five epochs would become more comparable in size. World historians tend to neglect modern times.

Finally, with respect to the future course of humanity, population growth is on a collision course with the earth’s finite territory and resources. Continued growth at present rates is physically impossible. We may confidently predict that something will happen to curtail the further growth of human populations on earth even if we cannot say what this will be.

Source: Colin McEvedy and Richard Jones, Atlas of World Population History (Penguin, 1978)

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